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Old 12-13-2009, 05:48 PM
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Tarok Tarok is offline
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Soldering PE

Hi all,

I'm keen to try soldering PE and am new to the whole soldering scene.

I've read a bit about using flux and resin-core solders, but would like to know: is it possible to use a "flux-core solder" in model-making to eliminate the need to manually apply flux & solder as a 2 part step?

Hope that makes scene

TIA

Rudi
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Old 12-14-2009, 04:23 PM
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No takers?

Rudi
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Old 12-14-2009, 08:26 PM
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Plushy Plushy is offline
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Rudi,
personally when i solder pe together i tend to use flux solder but i also apply a bit of extra flux to make sure that the solder flows into all the places i want it too . I also find giving the parts a good scrub with a Fibreglass pen before soldering helps to give a nice clean `grippy` surface for the solder to adhere to .

heres my current soldering project


Your best bet is to try both methods and find the one that works best for you .


hope this helps

Plushy
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Old 12-14-2009, 08:35 PM
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Tarok Tarok is offline
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Thumbs up

Cheers for the info, mate! Do you get your solder and flux from your local Bunnings/Mitre10?

BTW, great FT17 dio. Will you have this ready for W&T2010?

Rudi

p.s. hope all is well - heard about the bike wipe-outs
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Old 12-20-2009, 02:10 PM
marcb marcb is offline
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Like mentioned above,

The solder will flow where you aply the flux. It basicaly gives you control over the solder when it melts.
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Marc
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Old 12-21-2009, 12:56 AM
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I am no expert, but here is what I have learned:

1.) CLEAN! Copper alloys start to oxidize immediately, so before you solder, clean your joining surfaces. A scrubby pen does well, but there are other ways, even just burnishing with a toothpick helps.

2.) HOT IRON! this is personal style, and will vary with your technique. I like a hot iron so it's already done before I can chicken out.

3.) TOO LITTLE IS BETTER! I take my (solid-core) solder and cut little chunks, just what I need. I use the point of a knife to place it on the tip of the iron AT the joint once it's hot. Too much solder leaves a mess. There's a braided wick you cen get that will draw off excess solder if you reheat it.

4.) CLAMPS. Lots of clamps. I like my "third hand" and use it to hold stuff I'm about to join. Extra (flat) alligator clips can be used as heat sinks if you have something to solder near adjacent joints, stick one in between and it will keep the heat from reaching the existing one.

5.) CLEAN! Use a bit of steel wool to prep your tip before you begin and a bit of wet sponge to clean it between spots as I work. Never use a file. The tip is plated, and the coating helps a lot. My "third hand" has a place to keep a hot iron safely. You do NOT want it rolling onto your lap.

I should mention, I use a variable-heat iron that has a stand built into the power unit. It has replaceable needle tips, not like the pistol-type iron I have to electrical work. The shape and size of the tip makes a difference, too, and for some work you will want a wide flat tip (smoothing underneath fenders). I good rig might cost $60-$100 but if you use brass a lot in modellling it's like an airbrush, an essential tool, and it's worth getting a good one.

If you search, you wil find several how-to articles in the forum.

HTH

Scott Fraser
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Old 12-22-2009, 06:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarok View Post
Cheers for the info, mate! Do you get your solder and flux from your local Bunnings/Mitre10?

BTW, great FT17 dio. Will you have this ready for W&T2010?

Rudi

p.s. hope all is well - heard about the bike wipe-outs


Rudi try Dick Smith or Tandy electronics they will be your best bet for decent solder . i use a small butane soldering iron from bunnings and `Bakers` Solderine [ paste flux ] also from bunnings .

Yeah W and T 2010 is looking good as long as my recovery from the wipeouts goes to plan
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Old 12-23-2009, 04:03 PM
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Thanks for all the feedback, gents

Plushy, cheers mate. I picked up some solder from the local Bunnings down in Frangers. Funny you mention the flux paste - I was touch and go on buying it and then decided against it. Oh, well... guess I'll be heading back to Bunnings next week

Rudi
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